Advice & Inspiration

Thank You Thursday: Young Healers

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day is celebrated on 4th August. It’s an opportunity for all Australians to show their support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, as well as learn about the crucial impact that culture, family and community play in the life of every child.

Malpa is a charity that is doing just that. Through their health leadership program called Young Doctors, Malpa is training Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal young people to be health ambassadors for their communities. Designed and run by local Elders, along with respected community members and supported by health workers, this program teaches hygiene, health literacy, nutrition, and wellbeing as well as identity.

The Ngangkari, being the traditional Aboriginal healers in Central Australia, have been passing on their skills to the young for thousands of years. These skills are deeply embedded in Indigenous culture and life and now the idea has been given a new injection of life with the Young Doctors project.

As the young people become health leaders and peers to their younger community members, it is not only creating a stronger group of people but, is opening up career pathways to better health. In each of the areas the local language is used, and over a fun packed but structured program these communities are taught traditional and contemporary ways by respected members and Elders and as a result the Young Doctors are becoming health ambassadors.

The importance of hand hygiene, cleaning noses, washing, keeping the house and community clean as well as bush medicine etc. is learned by the Young Doctors. Malpa CEO, Don Palmer says:

“The whole idea is to equip kids on how to teach their brothers and sisters a healthier lifestyle.”

Some outcomes for the young doctors who have participated in this project include:
• 98% were found to be happy to go to school since becoming Young Doctors
• 100% thought about working in a job after completing school
• 100% reported knowing more about Aboriginal culture
• 3 in 5 enjoyed learning from their Elders and Aboriginal community leaders

With professionals such as doctors and dentists right across the country teaching children about having a good healthy lifestyle, the benefits about Indigenous issues are being learned; and the friendships made are about reconciliation and recognition between communities.

This Thank You Thursday, we say thank you to the team at Malpa and everyone involved in delivering the Young Doctors project.

See you in the pond,

The Fish Chick.

2019 Fish Scholarship Winner Announced

The 2019 Scholarship was our most competitive yet, with more than a dozen applications being received. The results of the 2019 Fish Scholarship are in and we are delighted to announce this year’s winner as Bridget Staude of Teach Learn Grow.

As our newest Fish Scholar, Bridget has won the opportunity to complete the Fundraising Institute of Australia’s Fundraising Essentials course. Congratulations Bridget!

Teach Learn Grow aims to improve the educational outcomes and aspirations of rural and remote students in socioeconomic disadvantaged areas so that they can reach their full potential. They do this by recruiting and training volunteers to provide free tutoring and mentoring – predominantly online – to young people experiencing educational disadvantage.

Bridget has recently taken on the role of CEO after working for a number of years as a teacher in rural WA.

“As a former volunteer of the organisation, I have seen first-hand the powerful impact it can have, and as the CEO I hope to support the continued growth and sustainability of the programs,” Bridget said.

“I hope to increase my knowledge of how the Australian fundraising sector is regulated, how data should be collected, and various fundraising channels and strategies,” she said.

Fish Community Solutions’ Director, Bianca Crocker, is excited about the Fish Scholarship’s first winner from Western Australia.

“Bridget’s application showed her passion for education of young people, but also an enthusiasm to learn more herself in ways that can really help their organisation,” Ms Crocker said.

Thank You Thursday: Knitting for Good

As we settle in to the heart of Australian winter I thought it would be timely to share the story of a small non-profit that was established about this time fifteen years ago. Melbourne experienced an extremely cold winter in July of 2004, that was when Ros Rogers noticed how popular knitting had become in winter, particularly knitted scarves, and that led her rally some family and friends and they knitted 180 scarves for those experiencing homelessness. The following year Ros established an official not-for-profit organisation called kogo – which stands for knit one, give one.

Australian Charities Report 2017 Fish Community Solutions

ACNC Australian Charities Report

The Australian Charities and Not-for-Profits Commission (ACNC) has recently released the Australian Charities Report for 2017.

The Australian Charities Report 2017 is the fifth annual analysis of the information the ACNC receives from charities in their Annual Information Statements. Download the full report here.

Key findings include:

  • Total revenue of $146.1 billion
  • Government grants as a revenue source increased by $7 billion
  • Donations and bequests as a revenue source totalled $9.9 billion
  • 3.3 million volunteers across Australia’s charities
  • Most registered charities (36%) are ‘extra small’, a subset of small
  • 30% of charities reported their main activity was religious activities
  • 4,567 charities operate overseas
  • The most common overseas operating locations include:
    • India
    • Philippines
    • Papua New Guinea
    • Indonesia
    • New Zealand
Bianca Crocker speaks at 2019 Australian Camps Association conference

The Fish Chick at Australian Camps Association Conference

If you’re on the Sunshine Coast later this month, Bianca will be speaking at the 2019 Australian Camps Association Conference.

‘Telling Our Story’ is the theme for the event, being held on 27 and 28 June, and The Fish Chick will be presenting on story telling for donors.

Telling your story to a potential funder is no less important than sharing it with supporters or the community, but sometimes it can be trickier as questions can be complex and word limits are tight.

As someone who has extensive experience working with small organisations, Bianca’s presentation will be informative and provide effective tools to writing better grants, learn where to access them and understanding the philanthropic grant environment in Australia.

You can find out more about the conference here.

Thank You Thursday: Real Goodness

A few weeks ago, I was fortunate to be in the audience of Dr Jane Goodall’s Rewind the Future Australian Tour. GOODall by name and good by nature. She is truly inspiring.

Since her groundbreaking and, at the time controversial, field study of chimpanzees in 1960,  Dr Goodall has gone on to carve out a career spanning more than five decades. She is not only a primatologist, but an activist, and not only for chimpanzees and other great apes, but for conservation more broadly and planet Earth as a whole. She truly believes that it’s all connected; that we’re all connected.

In 1977 Dr Goodall founded the Jane Goodall Institute and today there are more than 35 offices around the globe, including one here in Australia.

Jane Goodall Institute Australia was established in 2007 and works to promote the conservation of chimpanzees and other great apes (as our closest living relatives in the animal kingdom). Through their Roots & Shoots program they aim to empower the next generation to be socially and environmentally conscious citizens of our shared planet. The organisation hopes to:

  1. Foster a public understanding of the interconnection of people, animals and the environment.
  2. Create an ever expanding network of Australians who are inspired, engaged and empowered to become changes makers in local and global environmental and humanitarian projects.
  3. Increase public awareness of and support for the conservation of endangered animals in Australia.
  4. Increase public awareness of and support for conservation of Chimpanzees and other Great Apes.

Although it might be a small charity, so far, Jane Goodall Institute Australia have protected 3.4m hectares of habitat and ensured that more than 150 chimpanzees are cared for at a newly expanded sanctuary in Republic of Congo. And, most impressively, 500,000 young people are reached through the Australia Roots and Shoots program.

Surely, with this many young people taking an interest in conservation and sustainable living, Dr Goodall’s message is making a difference…

“Every single day you make an impact on the planet. You have a choice whether to make it positive or negative.”

We all know time is money, but how much would you spend to save our only home… planet earth? The organisation’s website currently has an interactive campaign to encourage people to donate 58 minutes of their time to rewind the doomsday clock before it’s too late.
Calculate what 58 minutes of your time is worth and get involved to save our planet here.

This Thank You Thursday we send our biggest thanks to Dr Goodall for her dedication and commitment to making our world truly a better place. And to those working toward the same mission at the Jane Goodall Institute Australia and around the world.  Like Jane said… ‘Together we can. Together we will.

See you in the pond,

The Fish Chick.